Indian troops continue state terrorism in occupied Kashmir, martyred a three feet tall Kashmiri Noor Mohammad Trantray

Indian troops continue state terrorism in occupied Kashmir, martyred a three feet tall Kashmiri Noor Mohammad Trantray in Pulwama, body recovered from the debris of a house Srinagar, Dec 26 : In occupied Kashmir, Indian troops in their fresh act of state terrorism, martyred a three feet tall Kashmiri Noor Mohammad Trantray in Pulwama district, today.The body of the three feet tall and 47-year-old Noor Mohammad Trantray was recovered from the debris of a house which was destroyed by the Indian occupation forces during crackdown operation in Samboora area of the district.
Literature hailing Burhan Wani as top Kashmir Freedom Fighter on sale in India’s Punjab State
http://www.kashmirnewstrust.com/literature-hailing-burhan-wani-top-kashmir-freedom-fighter-sale-indias-punjab-state
Published by Kashmir News Trust on December 26, 2017, 10:02 am
Jagdeep Singh Deep
Amritsar: He was the poster boy for the Hizbul-Mujahideen (HuM) in Kashmir. But Burhan Wani has also been adopted by Sikh radical groups, going by the sale of a magazine with him on the cover describing him as ‘Hero of Freedom of Kashmir’ at the Shaheedi Jor Mela in Fatehgarh Sahib on Monday, reported The Indian Express today.
A total of 10 lakh people are expected to congregate from Monday until December 27 at the mela, held annually to commemorate the martyrdom of Sahibzada Baba Zorawar Singh and Sahibzada Baba Fateh Singh, the young sons of the 10th Sikh master, Guru Gobind Singh.
The magazine was being sold in a big stall manned by supporters of SAD (Amritsar), near the Rauza Sharif, amidst other radical material including books, car stickers, badges on Khalistani militants including Jarnail Singh Bhindranwale.
Called ‘Vangaar’ (Challenge), the pro-Khalistan magazine ran a cover story in its August 2016 issue on Wani describing him as the ‘Hero of Freedom of Kashmir’. The issue came out a month after he was killed in an encounter with the security forces in July 2016, and was being sold 18 months later at the Jor Mela for Rs 30.
Apart from two articles on Wani, the 42-page issue of the magazine also carries a “special” message on “azadi” from Jagtar Singh Hawara, convicted in the Beant Singh assassination cases and now lodged in Tihar jail; an article on drug use in Punjab, an article on ISIS. The two articles on Wani have been written by Gajinder Singh of Dal Khalsa, who is believed to be in Pakistan, and the pro-Khalistani writer Baljeet Singh Khalsa.
Swaranjeet Singh, a resident of Ferozepur village who had bought a copy, said there is “nothing wrong in reading about anyone who had fought for any freedom struggle”. “I had heard about Wani in news, there were riots when he was cremated, I do not know who has written about him or who is selling it, I came here and the material appealed to me and I bought a copy, I will read it,” he said.
The seller who was selling the magazines and other material including books about many militants refused to disclose his name and said that he went to every religious function in the state and sold the material.
“We are only selling the magazines and the books. What’s wrong in it. Even police did not say anything to us, we are not harming anyone,” he said.
 Indian troops continue state terrorism in occupied Kashmir, martyred a three feet tall Kashmiri Noor Mohammad Trantray in Pulwama, body recovered from the debris of a house
Institutionalising violence
https://www.dawn.com/news/1378795/institutionalising-violence
Wasim KhalidDecember 26, 2017

The writer is a Srinagar-based journalist.
IT has been some nine months since Farooq Ahmed Dar was used as a human shield by the Indian Army. He was strapped to the bonnet of a jeep and then paraded through 28 villages when by-polls were held for the Srinagar-Budgam parliament constituency. Yet justice continues to elude him. Like the majority of the victims of rights abuse by the Indian Army in the past, he may never get any justice.

Indian troops continue state terrorism in occupied Kashmir, martyred a three feet tall Kashmiri Noor Mohammad Trantray in Pulwama, body recovered from the debris of a house Dar was snatched by soldiers at Utligam village on the orders of Maj Leetul Gogoi on April 9 when he was travelling to a nearby village to condole the death of his relative. The incident happened an hour after he had cast his vote at his village, which was verified by the election officials.

The lowly shawl weaver of Chill Brass village told me he was expecting only two things from the Indian state: a mobile phone and justice. “When the soldiers tied me to the jeep, my mother called me repeatedly. A soldier got angry and took away my phone and did not return it,” Dar told me. “I can’t afford another phone. I appeal to the army to please return my phone.”

Dar’s ordeal came to fore after a video clip showing him being paraded by the army went viral with a soldier atop the jeep warning people that “whosoever will protest or pelt stones at the army, he will meet the same fate (as Dar)”.

The issue grabbed headlines in the press — locally and abroad. Under pressure, Gogoi told the media that he did it to save the polling staff which was held hostage by protesters, a claim which stands unverified. The incident embarrassed the government following which the police registered an FIR against the army. The police recently told the J&K high court that investigations into the matter have not registered any headway because the army was not cooperating.

The use of human shields by the Indian Army in India-held Kashmir has been reported many times.

Indian troops continue state terrorism in occupied Kashmir, martyred a three feet tall Kashmiri Noor Mohammad Trantray in Pulwama, body recovered from the debris of a house The State Human Rights Commission recommended a million rupees be given to Dar as compensation for torture, humiliation and illegal confinement. But the government has refused to comply, arguing Dar has made no allegations of rights violation “against the state or any of its functionaries”. That has exposed the government’s duplicity on the issue: on the one hand, police have told the court that the army was not cooperating, and on the other that Dar has not levelled any allegations of rights abuse by the state or any of its organs.

Dar told me he was tortured and humiliated by the army. “I can’t sleep properly, and get nightmares even after nine months,” he said. He said soldiers were deriving sadistic pleasure from his plight. “They took a picture of me and said your father will be pleased to see it, not knowing my father was long dead,” Dar recalled.

The humble artisan, who lives with his mother, said he never pelted stones at the government forces and had voted that day, an act considered a betrayal by many Kashmiris due to the overwhelming sentiment for freedom. “I voted and yet they didn’t spare me. What would they do to the people who do not vote?” he asked.

What added insult to the injury was the Indian army chief Bipin Rawat awarding Maj Gogoi with a commendation card for his “sustained efforts in counter-insurgency operations”. The move was interpreted by people in India-held Kashmir and outside as an approval by the army for all methods to subdue the Kashmiris.

Not only Rawat, but many BJP leaders in New Delhi, and the hyper-nationalist New Delhi-based media, hailed Gogoi as a hero. T-shirts, emblazoned with the sketch of Dar sitting on the bonnet of the military jeep were also sold.

“Everything is fair in love and war,” retorted Ram Madhav, the BJP’s national general secretary, who is on deputation from the Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh to the BJP, when asked for his reaction on the army using civilians as human shields in Kashmir.

Dar was not the first such victim and nor will he be the last. The use of human shields by the Indian Army in held Kashmir has been reported many times in the past since the start of militancy in the 1990s.

Human rights organisations like the Coalition of Civil Society have documented a number of such cases where young men have been used as human shields during encounters with rebels. Many times the men were asked to lay explosive mines inside the buildings where the rebels were taking shelter because of which many people were killed or maimed.

Since the start of the armed rebellion, no soldier or officer found guilty by the courts has been prosecuted because of the protection they enjoy under the controversial Armed Forces Special Powers Act. The AFSPA has been lifted from several north-eastern Indian states but when it comes to Kashmir, the army and civilian leadership refuse to listen. Under this law, a soldier can shoot at anybody even on mere suspicion. Rights defenders say

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